• Kanye West Gets Trolled By Burger King Over Love For McDonald’s

    Kanye West Gets Trolled By Burger King Over Love For McDonald’s

    Burger King trolls Kanye West over his love for McDonald’s.

    Over the weekend, Kanye West revealed that McDonald’s is his favorite restaurant. While that’s not really shocking or newsworthy, it did spark several comments from not only his peers like Rick Ross but also rival fast-food companies. Earlier today, Burger King U.K.’s Twitter account had some shade to throw at ‘Ye.

    Burger King U.K.’s Twitter account went full-savage today after Kanye West tweeted that McDonald’s is his favorite restaurant. In light of ‘Ye’s behavior over the past few months, they quoted his tweet and said, “Explains a lot.” However, that wasn’t all they had to say to Kanye. After getting over 250K retweets on their initial tweet, the fast-food joint joked, “If we knew this was going to blow up we would have made a soundcloud.”

    BK also poked fun at Kanye’s recent announcement that he’d be leaving politics.  “eyes still closed I guess,” the tweet reads. Prior to this tweet, Kanye wrote on Twitter, “My eyes are now wide open and now realize I’ve been used to spread messages I don’t believe in. I am distancing myself from politics and completely focusing on being creative !!!”

    While BK seems to take Kanye’s love for McDonald’s personally, it shouldn’t be that surprising that ‘Ye prefers a Big Mac over a Whopper. ‘Ye penned a poem titled, “The McDonald’s Man” for Frank Ocean’s “Boys Don’t Cry” magazine that was released in conjunction with Blonde.

  • Dame Dash Hit With Restraining Order After Woman Claims He Threatened Her

    Dame Dash Hit With Restraining Order After Woman Claims He Threatened Her

    A business owner was granted a temporary restraining order against Dame Dash.

    A woman who owns a children’s hair salon is accusing Dash of threatening her life has been successfully granted a temporary restraining order against the music mogul, The Blast reports.

    A judge recently granted Patrice Miner, owner of a children’s hair salon, a restraining order against Dame Dash. The mogul has been barred from coming within 30 yards of her or her hair salon. Miner, who says Dash is an “investor and customer,” claims the Roc-A-Fella co-founder went inside of her hair salon and “walked up to me and threaten my life.” She alleges that Dash took a customer and proceeded to throw him out of the shop. Miner claims Dash said that she was “so lucky” there were people inside of the shop after he threw the customer outside of the store.

    Aside from this incident, Miner accused Dash of causing a scene and calling her names in front of the customers inside of the store. She said that he “yelled and screamed and called me an idiot in front of guests and customers.”

    In the documents Miner filed to request the temporary restraining order against Dash, Miner revealed that she didn’t give Dash any notice because she “was afraid that the violence would reoccur when I gave notice I was asking for these orders.”

    Although Miner was granted a temporary restraining order, there will be a hearing later this month to make it permanent.

  • Rihanna Sends Legal Warning To Trump Administration After Her Music Was Played At Rally

    Rihanna Sends Legal Warning To Trump Administration After Her Music Was Played At Rally

    The artist is making her stance official.

    Rihanna is the latest artist to send a cease and desist letter to the Trump administration asking the president to refrain from using her music during his political events. This legal action came after her song, “Don’t Stop the Music,” was played at the president’s rally Sunday in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

    The legal document sent by Riri’s team reiterates her very public disapproval of Trump and her desire to avoid being associated with him in any way.

    “It has come to our attention that President Trump has utilized Rihanna’s musical compositions and master recordings, including her hit track ‘Don’t Stop the Music,’ in connection with a number of political events held across the United States. As you are or should be aware, Ms. Fenty has not provided her consent to Mr. Trump to use her music. Such use is therefore improper.”

    “Trump’s unauthorized use of Ms. Fenty’s music … creates a false impression that Ms. Fenty is affiliated with, connected to or otherwise associated with Trump.”

    Rihanna had foreshadowed this moment after Phillip Rucker tweeted about her music being played on Sunday. She responded: “Not for much longer…me nor my people would ever be at or around one of those tragic rallies, so thanks for the heads up philip!”

  • Hillside Auto Mall Free BBQ Event With Major Artist Live Performances!

    Hillside Auto Mall Free BBQ Event With Major Artist Live Performances!

    When they say community driven business “Hillside Auto Mall” is well versed in bringing the community together with joint efforts of multi-media collectives to promote unity and good business practice in customer satisfaction. 

    COME ENJOY A DAY OF FREE FOOD & ENTERTAINMENT PERFORMING LIVE AS HILLSIDE AUTO MALL GIVE BACKS TO OUR COMMUNITY

    PRESENTS
    THE COMMUNITY BBQ & CAR SHOW
    SATURDAY JUNE 30, 2018
    FROM 1-5PM
    FREE TO ENTER
    FREE FOOD
    FREE ENTERTAINMENT
    Hosted by:
    @thuggin_n_bugginn And @Mrrubenjburgos
    Music by: @dj3stacks
    Location:
    HILLSIDE AUTO MALL
    150-01 HILLSIDE AVENUE
    JAMAICA , NY 11432

  • Music Promoter Job Description and Career Profile

    Music Promoter Job Description and Career Profile

    What is a Music Promoter?

    The main job of a music promoter, usually simply called a promoter, is to publicize a concert. Promoters are the people in charge of “putting on” the show. They work with agents, or in some cases, directly with the bands, and with clubs and concert venues to arrange for a show to take place. Promoters then are in charge of making sure the word gets out about that show. They also take care of arranging the incidentals, like hotels and backline for the band.

    In a nutshell, it is the promoter’s job to make sure things go off without a hitch. Note that this kind of promoter is different from a radio plugger or PR agent.

    What Jobs Should a Promoter Do?:

    If the promoter is not tied to a specific venue, they should:

    • Link with bands and agents to agree on a date for a performance
    • Negotiate a deal with the band/agent for the show – what fee will be paid? Will the promoter provide accommodation?
    • Book a venue for that agreed upon date
    • Promote the upcoming gig to the local press and radio, put up posters and email their mailing list
    • Make sure everything the band needs is in place – backline, accommodation, rider, etc.
    • Set up soundcheck times and the running order of the show
    • Arrange for a support band

    Venue tied promoters skip the “contact venue” step.

    What is the Pay Like?:

    The pay for promoters varies and depends on several factors, including:

    • The deal made with the band/agent
    • How popular the artists are with whom the promoter is working

    Indie music promoters can find it very hard to make money, and many indie promoters do promotion on the side of their “day jobs.”

    Promoters make their money off of the proceeds generated by a show. Promoters can either have two kind of deals with bands:

    • Pay the band a set fee, no matter how many people buy tickets
    • A door split deal

    With both deals, a promoter can easily lose money on a show. Making money as a promoter requires careful planning.

    Do Promoters Need a Contract?:

    When you are dealing with large sums of money, a contract is always a must. But many indie music promoters who know they won’t be making much money, if any, on a gig often skip the contract. Even if no money is exchanging hands at the end of the night, though, it is still a good idea for a band and promoter to have a contract that clearly states things like whether or not the promoter will provide accommodation, who is taking care of the backline, when the soundcheck is, how long the band’s set will be, what the band will get for a rider, and of course, how any profits will be split. It helps avoid confusion later.

    How Do I Become a Promoter?:

    There are two ways you can get into promoting. You can contact promoters and venues in your area and offer your services and learn the ropes that way, or you can try to get your promoting career off the ground yourself.

    If you want to work for yourself, start small. Pick a favorite local band and offer to promote a show for them. Book the venue, contact the local media and put up some posters advertising the show. If you do a good job, other bands will find you, and as you become an established promoter in your area, bands from out of the area will find you as well.

    Making Money as a Promoter:

    Promoters who work with mega stars who sell out huge venues can make some serious money. But indie music promoters can easily find themselves working all day, every day, and only getting deeper into debt. Many promoters have a day job that supports their promotion job. If you want to become a promoter, you need a clear understanding of the money involved, and you need to make deals with bands and venues very carefully. For any given show, a promoter’s expenses include:

    • Venue rental
    • Advertising (posters, newspaper/magazine advertisments, etc)
    • Backline rentals
    • Accommodation for the band
    • Rider
    • Payment for the band

    You can’t get around some of these fees, like the venue fee, but there are ways of mitigating some of the expenses involved in promoting, and if you want to stay in this for the long haul, you need to cut costs as much as you can. For instance, ask the band/label/agent to print posters and send them to you, instead of you taking that cost on. Don’t provide accommodation if the band’s show is not going to generate enough money to cover the costs, or if you must, put the band up at your house. Don’t provide overly generous riders – a few waters and a few beers is fine. Split the cost of renting special equipment with the band.

    You can also cut down on some of your expenses by working under a door split deal arrangement, instead of paying the band a set fee. That way, you make all of your money back first, and then the band gets paid if you get paid. Bigger artists will balk at this kind of deal and will want a set fee – paying a set fee is fine, and even ideal, when you’re working with a band who you know will sell enough tickets to recoup your costs. But if the band you’re putting on is just building a name for themselves, a door split deal is fair for everyone. Make sure the band try to sell some merchandise at the show to give them some extra money. If you have a door split deal, and the show didn’t make any money, a nice promoter might throw the band a little bit of gas money, which can go surprisingly far in earning you a rep as a good promoter!

    The truth is that many indie shows lose money, especially shows featuring new bands. As long as you are not withholding earnings from the band, it is perfectly OK to set up your shows so you lose as little as possible. Most up and coming bands will recognize that and will work with you. After all, if you succeed, they succeed. Being fair to both parties – yourself included – is the name of the game.

  • What is a music promoter?

    What is a music promoter?

    A Good Promoter Brings in People and Profits.

    Urban Media Global Network Collective & Artist Promotion Multimedia Music Network Architect & Founder Mr. Ruben J Burgos Aka Mr. Dope Chef explains what is a music promoter in this in depth article that entertainment professionals must read.

    A music promoter is someone who publicizes and promotes events and shows. They organize gigs, book bands or artists and advertise the shows to bring in paying attendees and profits.

    What Does a Music Promoter Do?

    The music promoter works with an artist or band manager to plan for a show to occur. They agree upon a date and look for an appropriate venue.

    The promoter negotiates any fees for the artist and then publicizes that event through radio, television, online or email advertising.

    The music promoter ensures the artists have everything they need, from hotel rooms to sound checks.

    The promoter typically creates a contract outlining the terms of the agreement, including fees owed to the promoter, date and time of sound checks, the length of the band’s performance and any other demands.

    What is a Music Promoter’s Work Environment?

    A music promoter typically works in a regular office and may have an assistant or a team. Some opt to meet with clients off-site, at restaurants or other entertainment locations. Others do most of their work online or over the phone.

    How Do I Become a Music Promoter?

    There isn’t a formal education path required to become a music promoter. The most essential skills are a love of music and business savvy, so a degree in business or marketing can be very useful. The ability to negotiate effectively is essential, as you will need to bargain with artists, venues, hotels and more.

    Understanding different aspects of the business is important. Read trade magazines to understand the latest developments and see how other events are put together.

    If possible, try to get an internship with an event management company. You can get experience planning and promoting major events, which can be invaluable, even if the events are not related to music.

    Many people start out on their own offering their services for free or at a steep discount to local bands trying to make a name for themselves. They check out smaller bars, cafes and fairs for venue options and research lower cost options for equipment or security. While you may not make any money for the first few events, these experiences can pave the way for larger and more lucrative opportunities going forward.

    Job Outlook

    Many people enter the business without fully understanding the demands of the job, so turnover and job burnout is high. For those who stay in the business, it can be fiercely competitive, as there are large amounts of people who try to succeed. Particularly for those just starting out, it can be difficult to get steady work within the industry.

    The average salary ranges from $30,000-50,000 for those employed by companies. For independent promoters, they receive a cut of tickets sold or a business fee.

    If you have a strong knowledge of music, a passion for the industry, outstanding communication and negotiation skills and motivation, you may excel as a music promoter.

    It’s a challenging and competitive career path, but it can be very rewarding work if you love what you do.

  • Dame Dash Hit With Restraining Order After Woman Claims He Threatened Her

    Dame Dash Hit With Restraining Order After Woman Claims He Threatened Her

    A business owner was granted a temporary restraining order against Dame Dash.

    A woman who owns a children’s hair salon is accusing Dash of threatening her life has been successfully granted a temporary restraining order against the music mogul, The Blast reports.

    A judge recently granted Patrice Miner, owner of a children’s hair salon, a restraining order against Dame Dash. The mogul has been barred from coming within 30 yards of her or her hair salon. Miner, who says Dash is an “investor and customer,” claims the Roc-A-Fella co-founder went inside of her hair salon and “walked up to me and threaten my life.” She alleges that Dash took a customer and proceeded to throw him out of the shop. Miner claims Dash said that she was “so lucky” there were people inside of the shop after he threw the customer outside of the store.

    Aside from this incident, Miner accused Dash of causing a scene and calling her names in front of the customers inside of the store. She said that he “yelled and screamed and called me an idiot in front of guests and customers.”

    In the documents Miner filed to request the temporary restraining order against Dash, Miner revealed that she didn’t give Dash any notice because she “was afraid that the violence would reoccur when I gave notice I was asking for these orders.”

    Although Miner was granted a temporary restraining order, there will be a hearing later this month to make it permanent.

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